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Do the government’s new regulations on cosmetic surgery go far enough?

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Do the government’s new regulations on cosmetic surgery go far enough?

The government has recently announced changes to cosmetic surgery regulations in an attempt to tighten up the industry.

The announcement follows a review by the NHS medical director in which he had recommended that the government introduce stricter laws, including making so called “anti-ageing injections” available by prescription only. The Government supported the view but argued its hands were tied at an EU level, with work ongoing regarding such products.

It was also suggested that new rules should be introduced to ensure that all cosmetic surgeons carry out consultations with patients prior to any surgery. However, under the new regulations announced by the government products such as derma fillers can be administered by someone who has had some form of training (details of which are still to be agreed).

It was suggested that new rules should be introduced to ensure that all cosmetic surgeons carry out consultations with patients prior to any surgery. It was also recommended that new rules be introduced so that all cosmetic surgeons have to carry out consultations with patients prior to any surgery.

There will also be no compulsory, central register of practitioners – whether for surgical or non-surgical procedures such as fillers – as recommended by the review. The Government said that it did not believe that a new regulated profession is the only way of improving patient safety by practitioners of non-surgical cosmetic interventions.

The review also recommended that patient consent to be obtained by the surgeon who will operate on them.

The Government said consent could be obtained by any surgeon, which critics argued means a surgeon could fly in from abroad, carry out the surgery and fly out again, giving patients no continuity of care.

A final recommendation of the review was that “socially irresponsible” advertising practices to be banned by professional codes of practice. These include time-limited special offers, cash inducements, buy-one-get-one-free deals or mother and daughter deals, refer a friend deals and offering surgery as competition prizes.

The government agreed with this stating that socially responsible advertising should be included in practice codes, but stopped short of banning special deals as suggested by the review.

If you have suffered an injury from a beauty treatment that was not your fault you may be able to make a no win no fee claim for compensation. We act for a number of clients who have suffered beauty related injuries and it is important that you get independent expert legal advice, preferably as soon as possible from one of our specialist lawyers.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your help in this matter. I will be in touch should I ever require your assistance with legal matters in the future.

Mr C N | Derby

All the staff I had contact with were extremely helpful, knowledgeable and efficient. No stone was left unturned in dealing with my injury claim as a result I am sure that my compensation was maximised and the claim went 100% in my favour. I am extremely grateful and impressed with all.

Mr J D | Nottingham

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